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Home Schooling

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moonfruit
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Home Schooling

Postby moonfruit » Fri Nov 13, 2009 6:49 pm

Does anyone here home school? Imogen and Luke go to the local village school which is lovely, as there are only about 13 in each class. This has worked well for Immy as she is ahead and it allows the teacher and TA to set her extra tasks so she doesn't get bored. But it doesn't a have full primary status and she is due to leave at the end of this academic year. She will need to transfer to a bigger primary school and travel by supplied bus. It only has a driver and no other adults, and at 8 I'm not sure she's ready for this. I couldn't pick up or drop off as I will have to take Luke and Will and Lottie start in the nursery for mornings. I've heard some unflattering reports about the school and the bus so would like to explore the option of home schooling. Can anyone offer any advice?

My dad and I would spilt the actual schooling if this makes a difference.

TIA Lisa

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Rae
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Re: Home Schooling

Postby Rae » Fri Nov 13, 2009 7:03 pm

No advice, but have you explored the options of other schools a little further away? Do they do school of the air in the UK? (I know in Aus this is aimed at people in very isolated areas).
Do you trust yourselves to be able to cover enough? If you do, then go for it.

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northernruth
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Re: Home Schooling

Postby northernruth » Fri Nov 13, 2009 9:01 pm

I'm not sure I could do it myself, but I think it's a great idea. I firmly believe that so much time is wasted in school and that the "academic" stuff could be dealt with in much less time, leaving time for more truly "educational" activities, linked to the seasons, outings etc

This is an extreme example as the young man involved was home schooled to 18, but I read this article in the TImes recently

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/education/article6872998.ece

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indigosky2k
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Re: Home Schooling

Postby indigosky2k » Fri Nov 13, 2009 9:13 pm

Not personally, obviously, yet :wink: but my sister home schooled her boys. The eldest 2 from being 10 and 8 and her youngest has never been to school. At 17 he's just started college.

Look here. I know this is where she started and got loads of info :D

And if you want I could get you some info off her when I go up next week. I'm seriously considering it myself for the little miss :D not sure I'm too keen on her going to any of the local schools here, not so much for the education, but for the children :-? Home schoolers have their own little community thing, a bit like CNT :wink: :giggle:

HTH

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ems
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Re: Home Schooling

Postby ems » Fri Nov 13, 2009 9:18 pm

I home schooled my bab, thats a while back now.. and I know of a couple of ppl on here that do ... if you think feel its the best thing for your family and the child, do it :)

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jules070603
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Re: Home Schooling

Postby jules070603 » Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:04 pm

I find the idea of homeschooling very interesting although not something I consider for us and our situation.

The thing that I can't get my head round though is how home schooling works for the later stages of education. If you don't have GCSEs and A levels are you limited in job prospects etc or do homeschoolers take these exams and if so how do you cope with higer level GCSE papers with algebra etc? I loved maths but I doubt I could teach a 16 year old what they'd need to pass their exams?

I liek the idea of less structure for younger children though, I imagine it suits them well just find it hard to picture for teenagers.

xxx

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indigosky2k
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Re: Home Schooling

Postby indigosky2k » Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:19 pm

jules070603 wrote:I find the idea of homeschooling very interesting although not something I consider for us and our situation.

The thing that I can't get my head round though is how home schooling works for the later stages of education. If you don't have GCSEs and A levels are you limited in job prospects etc or do homeschoolers take these exams and if so how do you cope with higer level GCSE papers with algebra etc? I loved maths but I doubt I could teach a 16 year old what they'd need to pass their exams?

My eldest nephew took 3 GCSE's, which he got B's in :wine: and did so after his parents had been in a very nasty car crash about 3 onths prior. He did all his revison completely self-motivated, but he is that kind of person. Granted it's not many, but he focused on them and it was enough for him to then get into college. The next one, I'm really not sure about GCSE's but he's now on his highest level NVQ at college and would like to work in IT, possibly as a teacher. The youngest, again I don't think he's done any GCSE at home, but that is what he has gone to do at college.
Personally I agree with you in that I'd HS Kacie for her primary years, but would then see what my options are for her as she's older and of course it may depend on further children :wink: I think my sisters kids have done very well considering IMO they never had enough structure to there HSing day. I would do things very different to my sister in that regard and would get very involved with any other HSer's in my area.
As for how you cope with harder subjects, the boys did distance learning courses, which I think they get some kind of grant for as all children are entitled to free education :wink: and so they had a tutor who could talk them through stuff if the books they had weren't good enough. And the tutor sent mock exam papers and then marked them and told them what they needed to work on. It's possibly even easier in that regard than having to help your children with homework from school that maybe makes no sense to you :-? :roll:

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gayleygoo
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Re: Home Schooling

Postby gayleygoo » Fri Nov 13, 2009 11:24 pm

Its something I would consider (if Molly didn't get into the integrated primary here, we wouldn't want to send her to any of the others). I'm not concerned about the "quality" of education that she'd receive, as I believe most homeschooled children do just as well, if not better than their main-schooled friends. I'd also be concerned about social skills, as I dont think there are any groups round here for homeschooled children, and there aren't many other kids her age we know for her to play with - not that this is always an issue, especially as Imogen has siblings! I thin it would also be quite nice to "get them off to school for a few hours a day" so homeschooling can be a huge committment on your own part. Sharing with your dad would really be a bonus though :D

She doesn't need to follow a curriculum or take exams, so learning can be very natural. If she chooses to do GSCE's later on, you can always do the preparation required at the time. Even at that, most jobs only ask for Maths and English GCSEs, and with a little preparation, those can easily be passed by a homeschooler!

Homeschooling tends to be more about life learning and experiences, and IMO probably more valuable than the education many children get in schools! How many 16yr olds leave school still unable to read, write, boil an egg or have an understanding of budgeting or running a home? Many children feel that school is "pointless" because they can't attribute what they're learning to real life examples, or have an understanding of why they'd need to know something. (Making a batch of homebrewed wine or beer can teach more science than a bunsen burner :wink: )

You can always give it a go for a year or so, and if it doesn't seem to be working then consider school. I can't really offer much actual advice, but there are bound to be some forums and info sites that could help more! The green parent magazine usually has some articles on homeschooling, I can see if there are any issues that might be of help, and post them to you?



Gayle

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jules070603
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Re: Home Schooling

Postby jules070603 » Sat Nov 14, 2009 9:10 am

Thats really interesting - Thanks. I suppose I didn't think of the tutor aspect where you could have someone come in for specific reasons if you weren't able to cover something.

Good luck to everyone thinking of giving it a go. It will certainly be interesting to hear the stories of any of the babies on here who go on to have homeschooling.

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