hf1

Breastfeeding and dummy

My avatar
littlesez
Cloth Nappy Chatterbox
Cloth Nappy Chatterbox
Site Supporter

Re: Breastfeeding and dummy

Postby littlesez » Mon Jan 25, 2010 5:27 pm

To the OP I think your question was has anyone experience of using dummies and breast feeding? Here is my experience if it helps :D

I have been breastfeeding for 11 months and using a dummy. I had severe nipple pain as we couldn't get the hang of the latch straight away :cry: I also was extrememly exhausted in the early days and so giving a dummy and expressed breast milk so i could have a little rest as :bf: was soooooo painful i was :cry: and swearing at every feed :oops: It may not of helped the latching issues using a dummy but i was extremely distressed and she seemed soothed by a dummy.

If a dummy helps a mum to have some respite then so be it, i know how you feel I was deperate! so dummy it was it soothes her still now :babyroll: It most certainly has not affected our relationship! she would choose :bf: over a dummy anytime and shows no sign of weaning :D she fed constantly as a newborn and stll feeds regularly now :D

so it depends if your happy to :bf: allllll the time :giggle: carry on but if your happy for bubs to have a bit of comfort from a dummy , if you feel ok about that then do it :hug:

My avatar
Allie
Cloth Nappy Clanger
Cloth Nappy Clanger
Thankyou Moderators :)

Re: Breastfeeding and dummy

Postby Allie » Mon Jan 25, 2010 5:31 pm

Velvetsteph wrote:The kind of attitude that says 'if you don't like how I speak then don't listen to me' sucks quite frankly and isn't welcome here in MY opinion. (I stress this isn't necessarily everyone's opinion) this is a very friendly and welcoming forum so please help to keep it that way.

Life would be very boring if we all thought the same way ;)


I absolutely agree with Steph. Everyone is entitled to their opinion and a good debate is healthy and welcomed. As Steph says this is a friendly forum and we want it to stay that way.

As regards to the original subject, I can't offer any advise either way as both my children were (and Dexter still is) bottle fed.

My avatar
Amanda
Cloth Nappy Worshipper
Cloth Nappy Worshipper

Re: Breastfeeding and dummy

Postby Amanda » Mon Jan 25, 2010 5:52 pm

nappynutter wrote:
northernruth wrote:Dummies are kind of recommended now as a precaution against SIDS, so don't be too put off.


This research was paid for by a dummy manufacturer. Dummies lower the risk of SIDS in babies who are sleeping in a cot in another room who are bottle fed because the dummy helps prevent the baby from sleeping for long periods and too deeply. Breastfeeding and co-sleeping are considerably more effective at achieving this the way nature intended. :wink:


The trouble is that there are so many schools of thought. I have no idea who carried out the research but just last week my friend who is 37wks pg with her 2nd baby told me that her MW has told her that dummies can reduce the risk of cot death. At the same time, many HVs will still say co-sleeping can increase the risk of cot death. So it may well be what nature intended, but that doesn't make it necessarily safer for an overweight smoker who enjoys a glass of wine in the evening for example.

Back to the original question about whether dummies affect milk supply. Neither of my boys took a dummy, I weaned Connor at 15mths when I was pg, and Finn self-weaned at 11mths (and before anyone might say a baby does not self-wean before 18mths, I assure you he did). A friends' two girls are almost identical ages to my boys and both had dummies from birth. She also weaned her dd1 at around 15mths when pg with dd2, and dd2 continued to bf for quite a bit longer than Finn did. Additionally I had bad problems with Connor's latch whereas she sailed through bf from day 1. So I guess, as with everything, every baby's different!

I'm afraid I can't not mention this:
nappynutter wrote:I'm perfectly aware of my posting style. If you don't like it, don't read my posts. :wink:
This implies you're aware your style may cause offence or not be to the liking of some. If that's the case IMHO you are in a position to moderate it. I'm not saying we should please everyone all the time, but we do aim to at least be polite and not dismiss the advice given by others as being incorrect!

My avatar
nappynutter
Cloth Nappy Fanatic
Cloth Nappy Fanatic

Re: Breastfeeding and dummy

Postby nappynutter » Mon Jan 25, 2010 6:32 pm

Amanda wrote:I'm afraid I can't not mention this:
nappynutter wrote:I'm perfectly aware of my posting style. If you don't like it, don't read my posts. :wink:
This implies you're aware your style may cause offence or not be to the liking of some. If that's the case IMHO you are in a position to moderate it. I'm not saying we should please everyone all the time, but we do aim to at least be polite and not dismiss the advice given by others as being incorrect!


Okay this is getting out of hand.

I offered my opinion on dummies. I was asked for more information. (I don't see anyone else being asked to provide evidence to back up their opinion). Then I was criticised for providing the additional information. Then my posting style was criticised. My posting style is to the point. There is nothing wrong with that. It is not intended to be offensive. If my opinion offends people, that does not mean I should have to moderate my opinion.

The bottom line is that WHO and government advice is that dummies should not be routinely recommended and the risks should be pointed out to breastfeeding mothers.

Also, recent research has indicated that a parent's desire to use a dummy is often an indication that something is going wrong with breastfeeding and that this should be investigated and any problems resolved rather than offering a dummy as a solution.

Again, not intending to cause offence to anyone using a dummy, I'm just posting information that could be useful to the OP.

My avatar
smilinglou
Cloth Nappy Addict
Cloth Nappy Addict

Re: Breastfeeding and dummy

Postby smilinglou » Mon Jan 25, 2010 7:04 pm

This has all helped me (i tried the co sleeping but actually for me found it easier strangely to put her back in her basket, i think i dont dose off easily because i was used to working night shifts before and i think that helps to stay awake and go to sleep as soon as shes down), I also tried the towel trick which was great to not have to wear bras with pads.

I think informed choice is the best idea, read the info that has been researched by the medical pros and then chat and get support from sites like this, we dont have to make a decision and that's it, we can change our minds and these things change quickly, what works one day doesnt the next lol, so knowing the facts (which is why all the links that have been posted are really helpful) and finding support from other people who have been through similar things is great, sometimes people miscommunicate and can get a bit ruffled on internet forums (especially with things like parenting; it's a hugely difficult and amazing thing, then add lack of sleep, hormones, feeling worried and often perhaps guilty which is daft really lol why do we do this to ourselves) so no wonder things sometimes get out of hand, i really like these forums everyone is so lovely you dont often find that on other sites, every child and parent is different and what works for some doesnt for others, i think an open view to these things is best actually, i never thought id think about (or need to) the whole giving dummies or bottles (i.e. the artificial teats dilema) but stuff happens and its best to just keep open iv found, so much changes when your baby actually arrives lol!
anyway thanks for all the advise and experiences on this and the co sleeping, theres risks in everything we do and i think as long as you know the facts and use your common sense see what works for you!
this is all helping me to chill out a bit more and be less 'new mum stressed' lol and stop worrying about every little decision i make!
thanks again ladies :hug:

My avatar
beffys
Cloth Nappy Disciple
Cloth Nappy Disciple

Re: Breastfeeding and dummy

Postby beffys » Mon Jan 25, 2010 7:10 pm

nappynutter wrote:Also, recent research has indicated that a parent's desire to use a dummy is often an indication that something is going wrong with breastfeeding and that this should be investigated and any problems resolved rather than offering a dummy as a solution.


Just to add that the problem with generalised research is that is is in fact generalised based on whatever study group or sample sector so trends don't necessarily line up with individual experiences or whole populations for that matter. In my experience my DD used a dummy and BF quite happily and plainly she knew the difference as no milk comes out of a dummy.

From our perspective it didn't have any negative affect at all, in fact all the benefits were positive and I was quite capable of managing the demand supply loop myself and keeping up and allowing for LOs demand. That was feeding from one side exclusively, because the other side never worked very well and keeping LO up between the 91st and 98th centile exclusively BFing on one side only, while also using a dummy. A dummy had no impact on our control of demand and supply. It works very well for some parents and we still maintained an incredibly attached form of parenting by co-sleeping and sling wearing until 6 months when my lung collapsed. You can't imagine how important BFing and co-sleeping became at the point as it as about the one thing I was ablem to do easily.

The only thing I was concerned about was the affect it might have on LAM and my natural contraception (not that I should have worried really considering :giggle: ). Ella didn't wean early in fact the thing that seemed to put her over the edge in terms of weaning completely was when I miscarried when she was 15 months and I think that must have affected supply and taste, plus I don't think I was at full luteal competence by then, BFing aside. I completely agree with the research in terms of SIDS for dummy use and for co-sleeping in terms of how that research was funded, but I think it's important to provide feedback and guidance that's constructive and that won't intimidate the original poster into thinking they are being a bad parent depending on what they choose to do. Opinion is just that and it's doesn't mean everyone else must be wrong if they parent differently.

I think it's really sad that this thread has turned into a competely separate conversation to what the original poster asked for feedback about, so I think it should refocus on helping that person out non judgementally, rather than on the bluntly expressed opinions on whether generally to use a dummy or not.

Oh and on the subject of thumbs and fingers, my sister and I sucked our fingers and my brother sucked his thumb and that was a main factor in me deciding to use a dummy instead as I knew it would be easier to stop using a dummy than to stop sucking a digit, but each to their own obviously.

My avatar
smilinglou
Cloth Nappy Addict
Cloth Nappy Addict

Re: Breastfeeding and dummy

Postby smilinglou » Mon Jan 25, 2010 7:19 pm

Also, recent research has indicated that a parent's desire to use a dummy is often an indication that something is going wrong with breastfeeding and that this should be investigated and any problems resolved rather than offering a dummy as a solution.


interesting info there, it's not just breastfeeding that could be the problem though, with us it was problems with other things, she was really coliccy and not sleeping at night for hours on end, a dummy i thought would settle her, now she sleeps more i dont think about it as much, but then again when she was feeding all the time at one night i thought about the dummy then, but the breastfeeding is going really well, its an emotional thing, you feel stressed having to be constantly there depended upon 24/7 for the first time ever really (first time mum), and the dummy or anything else that can give you a bit of piece becomes a great need lol, i grit my teeth and now things are settling im glad i didnt give it but in that i dont mean i would ever judge myself or anyone for giving one, its completely understandable.
so yeh for us trying other things before offering a dummy was really worth it, again it's being chilled out and taking it all as it comes
I've got so many lessons to learn lol and we're only a month in

beffys yes please anymore advise or experiences is much welcome! some of the things that were posted yesterday have really helped already, last night we got 3 and a half hours sleep in a row lol!!!

My avatar
megansmummy
Cloth Nappy Goddess
Cloth Nappy Goddess

Re: Breastfeeding and dummy

Postby megansmummy » Mon Jan 25, 2010 7:20 pm

nappynutter wrote:I offered my opinion on dummies. I was asked for more information. (I don't see anyone else being asked to provide evidence to back up their opinion).

It was this statement that Steph asked for more info on rather than your own personal opinion, i couldnt actually find your personal opinon anywhere :-? , no one should have to give evidence to back up their own opinion becuase its simply that...YOUR take on the matter but you posted a statement and were asked for link to it... Didnt want you to think you were asked for evidence about your OPINION...
nappynutter wrote:This research was paid for by a dummy manufacturer. Dummies lower the risk of SIDS in babies who are sleeping in a cot in another room who are bottle fed because the dummy helps prevent the baby from sleeping for long periods and too deeply. Breastfeeding and co-sleeping are considerably more effective at achieving this the way nature intended. :wink:


Lou, im glad things are a bit better!! :hug:

My avatar
nappynutter
Cloth Nappy Fanatic
Cloth Nappy Fanatic

Re: Breastfeeding and dummy

Postby nappynutter » Mon Jan 25, 2010 7:42 pm

The only statement in the post you have quoted above is the part about FSIDS research being funded by a dummy manufacturer. The rest is my opinion based on research.

I don't really see the point of going round and round in circles. I have no reason to justify my opinions or my posting style any further.

PreviousNext

Return to Baby and Toddler